Friday, July 10, 2009

Revision hell

I am in revision hell. Basically, I am re-reading "Grey Matters" for the umpteenth time and it is driving me nuts. I want to second guess every sentence, replace every image. This is my last change to make serious changes (though I'll see it again after the copy editor gets through and again on proofs) and the pressure is enormous.

I don't know why it should be this way. I liked this book before I sent it off. And my editor likes it a lot, too. In fact, she had very few suggestions for changes and the book is already scheduled for publication. I've printed out her email to remind me of this, whenever the going gets too rough.

Still, reading and revising again feels like pulling my fingernails out. And then trying to replace them. I hate it. I hate it. I hate it. OK, back to work.

6 comments:

Ingrid King said...

As a new author, I'm certainly not going to offer any advice - I look up to you for guidance and have nothing to offer in this arena, except to say that it makes me feel a little better that even a successful, established writer like you goes through this. That being said, I've read almost everything you ever wrote and so far, it's all been perfect. Why would "Grey Matters" be any different?

You KNOW it's a good book - deep down inside, you do. Reread your last two blog post....

Clea Simon said...

Oh purrs.
I think it's fear - what did I miss? what did I screw up? - but thank you!!

chris said...

I feel your pain. It's like dieing.

chris v said...

Hey clea, at this point of the re-read, wondering, how much do you change? What do you fix? Just curious.

Clea Simon said...

Hi Chris,
At this point, I'm looking mainly for raw bits of writing that just don't sound good. But I'm also checking for continuity (just had to go back and make sure Dulcie had met someone already as she says, I've been over this so many times, I wasn't sure.) And I'm looking to trim a bit of one subplot that my editor suggested (minor) and add a little bit more in one other area - a matter of word and line changes, not full-page changes.

Caroline Leavitt said...

The problem is always that you are so close, you can't tell anymore what is good and what needs work, but I bet it is great!